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Our Research

 

cyber bullying

(Cyber)Bullying

This research investigates the antecedents and consequences of (cyber)bullying. A main aim is to understand how specific characteristics of online communication might change the dynamics of peer victimization during childhood and adolescence. The work includes a two wave longitudinal survey among over 1000 primary and secondary school students. This project was initially funded through the NWO program Maatschappelijk Verantwoord Innoveren (2010-2013).

Members of this research team are: Dr. Sindy Sumter, Dr. Susanne Baumgartner, Professor Patti Valkenburg, Professor Jochen Peter, Professor Simone vd Hof (eLaw Institute, Leiden University)

Digital Media in Early Childhood

Digital Media in Early Childhood

This research investigates to what extent apps for young children (3 to 7 years of age) have distinctive features that make them particularly suited to support children’s development. Using a range of methodology (i.e., survey, content analysis, interview, experiments) as well as a range of populations (parents, children’s media creators, and children), this research area aims to provide important insight into the positive potential of digital apps for young children.

Members of this research team are Dr. Jessica Piotrowski, Professor Hans Beentjes, Professor Patti Valkenburg, and Francette Broekman.

Entertainization of Childhood

Entertainization of Childhood

Awarded to Professor Patti Valkenburg, the ERC-funded project “The Entertainization of Childhood” is a four-year longitudinal project designed to understand the risks and opportunities of media use for children. Working with 900 families in the Netherlands (two cohorts; 3-7 years old; 10-14 years old), this project is one of the largest of its kind to ask whether and how children may be susceptible to media effects. Guided by the Differential Susceptibility to Media Effects Model, this research investigates how dispositional, developmental, and social factors may influence children’s preference for media and processing of media. Outcomes of interest include aggressive behavior, ADHD symptoms, cognitive ability, prosocial behavior, and social-emotional development.

Members of this research team are Professor Patti Valkenburg, Dr. Jessica Piotrowski, Dr. Helen Vossen, Sanne Nikkelen, Karin Fikkers, and Maria Koutamanis.

Media Multitasking

Media Multitasking

With universal accessibility to media technologies, youth increasingly squeeze more media content into the same amount of time by multitasking. The increasing prevalence of media multitasking among youth is worrisome because it has been argued that frequent media multitasking may lead to attention problems and lower academic performance in adolescents. However, empirical research to support this argument is lacking. Using both longitudinal and experimental methodology, this area of research designed to provide causal information on the relationship between media multitasking, attention problems, and academic performance as well as isolate individual differences in susceptibility to media multitasking effects.

Members of this research team are Dr. Susanne Baumgartner, Dr. Sindy SumterProfessor Patti Valkenburg and Winneke van der Schuur.

Online Self Presentation

Online Self Presentation

This research is interested in understanding the effects of adolescents’ and young adults' online self-presentation, via social media, on psychosocial well-being. This work brings together knowledge from communication science, developmental psychology, and pedagogical sciences to identify how young people's presentation of themselves online may support or harm well-being. Questions related to individual susceptibility to the positive or negative influences of self-presentations are of particular interest in this research area.

Members of this research team include Dr. Dian de Vries, Professor Jochen Peter, Professor Patti Valkenburg, Dr. Susanne Baumgartner, and Sophie Waterloo

Sexual Risk and Sexual Socialization

Sexual Risk and Sexual Socialization

This research focuses on the consequences of adolescents' and young adults' media use for their sexual socialization and psycho-social development. Specifically, using longitudinal and experimental methodology, this research area investigates the effects of young people's use of (online) sexually explicit material on their sexual attitudes and behaviors. It also focuses on the question who is most susceptible to the effects of sexual media use, as well as on differences in the specific content of sexually explicit material.

Members of this research team are: Professor Jochen Peter, Dr. Inge Boot, Dr. Laura VandenboschAnnemarie van Oosten, and Marleen Klaassen.

videogameaddiction

Video Game Addiction

This research area is designed to understand young people's pathological gaming, particularly the antecedents and consequences of pathological gaming. To facilitate this line of research, CcaM researchers have developed a reliable and valid survey instrument to measure computer and video game addiction. Work in this area includes several longitudinal studies designed to identify the psychosocial causes of game addiction among adolescents as well that the influence of pathological gaming on aggressive behavior.

Members of this research team are: Dr. Jeroen Lemmens, Professor Patti Valkenburg, and Professor Douglas Gentile (Iowa State University).

Youth & Commercialism

Youth & Commercialism

This area of research investigates the (1) unintended effects of advertising, (2) the intended effects of advertising, and the (3) unintended effects of watching commercialized reality television. Research on the unintended effects of advertising asks how advertising influences materialism and life satisfaction. Research on the intended effects of advertising, on the other hand, investigates the development of youth’s brand recognition and brand recall as well as asks how advertising can stimulate healthy food consumption. And most recently, the youth and commercialism area has also begun to ask how commercialized reality television may influence adolescents’ and emerging adults’ materialism and narcissism. 

Members of this research team are: Dr. Suzanna Opree, Professor Patti Valkenburg (intended effects), and Dr. Rinaldo Kühne (commericialized reality television). CcaM Fellow Professor Moniek Buijzen ( Radboud University Nijmegen) continues to collaborate on work investigating the unintended effects of advertising.